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February 3, 2017

Quotations by W.B. Yeats


WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS (1865-1939), 2OTH CENTURY IRISH POET AND PLAYWRIGHT

Quotations by W.B. Yeats

“Everything exists, everything is true, and the earth is only a little dust under our feet.”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore

“We can make our minds so like still water that beings gather about us that they may see, it may be, their own images, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life because of our quiet.”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore

“All changed, changed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born.”
~ W.B. Yeats, Easter 1916

“For he would be thinking of love
Till the stars had run away
And the shadows eaten the moon.”
~ W.B. Yeats, Brown Penny

“What hurts the soul
My soul adores”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Lady's First Song

“Out of Ireland have we come.
Great hatred, little room,
Maimed us at the start.
I carry from my mother's womb
A fanatic heart.”
~ W.B. Yeats, Remorse for Intemperate Speech

“Faeries, come take me out of this dull world,
For I would ride with you upon the wind,
Run on the top of the dishevelled tide,
And dance upon the mountains like a flame.”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Land of Heart's Desire

“Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Stolen Child

“Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Second Coming

“Why should I blame her that she filled my days
With misery, or that she would of late
Have taught to ignorant men most violent ways,
Or hurled the little streets upon the great,
Had they but courage equal to desire?
What could have made her peaceful with a mind
That nobleness made simple as a fire,
With beauty like a tightened bow, a kind
That is not natural in an age like this
Being high and solitary and most stern?
Why, what could she have done, being what she is?
Was there another Troy for her to burn?”
~ W.B. Yeats, No Second Troy

“Be you still, be you still, trembling heart;
Remember the wisdom out of the old days:
Him who trembles before the flame and the flood,
And the winds that blow through the starry ways,
Let the starry winds and the flame and the flood
Cover over and hide, for he has no part
With the lonely, majestical multitude.”
~ W.B. Yeats, To my Heart, bidding it have no Fear

“Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.”
~ W.B. Yeats, The Wind Among the Reeds

“We know their dream; enough
To know they dreamed and are dead;
And what if excess of love
Bewildered them till they died?”
~ W.B. Yeats, Michael Robartes and the Dancer

“When you are old and grey and full of sleep
And nodding by the fire, take down this book,
And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep”
~ W.B. Yeats, When You Are Old

“An aged man is but a paltry thing,
A tattered coat upon a stick, unless
Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing
For every tatter in its mortal dress”
~ W.B. Yeats, Sailing to Byzantium

“Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.”
~ W.B. Yeats, Sailing to Byzantium

“Never shall a young man,
Thrown into despair
By those great honey-coloured
Ramparts at your ear,
Love you for yourself alone
And not your yellow hair.”
~ W.B. Yeats, For Anne Gregory

“And what if excess of love
Bewildered them till they died?”
~ W.B. Yeats, Michael Robartes and the Dancer

"I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee;
And live alone in the bee-loud glade."
~ W.B. Yeats, The Lake Isle of Innisfree

“O bid me mount and sail up there
Amid the cloudy wrack,
For Peg and Meg and Paris' love
That had so straight a back,
Are gone away, and some that stay
Have changed their silk for sack.”
~ W.B. Yeats, A Man Young And Old

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